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Karl Barth on the Ascension of Christ

via Karl Barth on the Ascension of Christ

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“The Beloved Community”: The Quest of Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Martin Luther King, Jr. for “True Humanity”

Hendrickson Publishers Blog

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director

The year 1968 seems to have been a pivotal year. It was the year of Prague Spring as Czechoslovakia fought for independence from the Soviet Union, North Korea captured the USS Pueblo and held American servicemen hostage for almost a year, tragedy exploded in My Lai and the Tet Offensive in Vietnam, Bobby Kennedy was assassinated, and Thomas Merton and Karl Barth both died on December 10. It was also the year of the first orbit around the moon, the first 747 jumbo jet, the first successful heart transplant, the launch of Intel, 60 Minutes aired for the first time, The Beatles released The White Album, the anti-war musical Hair opened, London Bridge was sold and later moved from England to Arizona, and McDonalds sold their first Big Mac (for 49 cents).

The problem of race relations in the U.S. was also heating…

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A Leopard Tamed: A Book Fifty Years Too Early

via A Leopard Tamed: A Book Fifty Years Too Early

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Happy 140th Birthday, Martin Buber!

via Happy 140th Birthday, Martin Buber!

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The Reason to Smile at Christmas—Musings on Luther, Barth, Foyle, and Longfellow

Hendrickson Publishers Blog

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director

And the Word became flesh, and dwelt among us, (and we beheld his glory, glory as of the only begotten from the Father,) full of grace and truth.

By “flesh” we understand the whole man, body and soul, according to the Scriptures, which call man “flesh,” as above, when it is said, “Not of the will of the flesh”; and in the creed we say, “I believe in the resurrection of the body” (German: flesh), that is, of all men. . . . The evangelist [John] uses a comprehensive word and says, “He became flesh,” that is, a man like every other man, who has flesh and blood, body and soul. . . . He came that he might become the Light of men, that is, that he might become known; he showed himself bodily and personally among men and was made man. …

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“A Heart Deeply Affected”: Musings on Jonathan Edwards, William Shakespeare, Tom Stoppard, and Edward Albee

Hendrickson Publishers Blog

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director, Hendrickson Publishers

I am bold in saying this, but I believe that no one is ever changed, either by doctrine, by hearing the Word, or by the preaching or teaching of another, unless the affections are moved by these things. No one ever seeks salvation, no one ever cries for wisdom, no one ever wrestles with God, no one ever kneels in prayer or flees from sin, with a heart that remains unaffected. In a word, there is never any great achievement by the things of religion without a heart deeply affected by those things.

—Jonathan Edwards, A Treatise Concerning Religious Affections (1746)

A Tale of Two Plays (and a Play within a Play)

Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

I have seen two plays lately: Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead by Tom Stoppard, and Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? by Edward Albee. The first one…

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What It Means to Take up Your Cross: A Lenten Meditation

Hendrickson Publishers Blog

By Patricia Anders, Editorial Director

“It’s not so simple following Jesus to Jerusalem. What he says is so grave and serious.” These are the opening words in a chapter titled “Take up Your Cross” in Barbed Wire and Thorns: A Christian’s Reflection on Suffering, by Swedish writer and pastor Lena Malmgren. “If any want to become my followers,” she continues with Jesus’ words, “let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me. For those who want to save their life will lose it, and those who lose their life for my sake, and for the sake of the gospel, will save it.”

In this time of Lenten reflection, we need to ask ourselves what Jesus means by this. How can we take up our cross and follow him? Perhaps Luke in his Gospel can shed a bit more light on this statement from Jesus: “If…

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